Skip to Page Content

News & Media

NetHope Solution Center

SPECIAL INVITE: Call for ICT4D Stories, Questions and Insight!

 

Greetings NetHope Academy Interns & Alumni,

The NetHope Solutions Center is looking for new contributors for our blog and forum discussions, and we have selected you as part of this special offer!
The NetHope Solutions Center is an online tool for development communities around the world to learn and share how technology is helping to solve local challenges. Hundreds of international NGOs and like-minded organizations visit the Solutions Center each day to discover best-fit ICT solutions for their programs’ work as well as find resources in our growing knowledge base of blogs, case studies, resources and webinars.
We invite you create new content, share quality resources or ask questions in the forum; not only will you help make the Solutions Center better, but you’ll be given the opportunity to build your international reputation as a thought leader and drive your career forward.

 

Here are some suggested high-level angles for inspiration:

  • You are interested in a product or technology to solve a local challenge, and you write a blog about it
  • You have tried 1-3 solutions for a given challenge, and you have an opinion on which product is the best, so you write a blog comparing them
  • You read a set of interesting articles and you have an opinion on a current trend or event, so you post a topic in the forum
  • You have a question related to development and technology, so you post a topic in the forum

 

To submit your blog, please visit the contribution page: http://solutionscenter.nethope.org/contribute.

 

If you have a forum topic, register for a free NetHope Solutions Center account here: http://solutionscenter.nethope.org/account/login/forum

Looking forward to receiving your submissions!


Haiti_2010

Haiti NetHope Academy Program – 4 Years Later

All eyes were on Haiti after a massive earthquake rattled Port-au-Prince on January 12, 2010. The already poor infrastructure crumbled, leaving the people of Haiti reeling with severe physical and emotional loss. Meeting basic needs and finding meaningful work soon became even more challenging to a populace where more than two thirds or the workforce does not have a formal job.

To read the rest of the story about the Haiti NetHope Academy Program, please click  here.


Hundreds of Interns made Employable

Thriving Partnership Between Government and Private Sector Has Trained Thousands of Graduated Since Inception

Pretoria News | Star Workplace | Amanda Maliba

07/02/2014

Every time something good happens, we come together to celebrate collectively.  Something good has happened for many of us in this room today and we are here to celebrate, says Shaka Sisulu in his opening speech at the 2014 Microsoft Student2Business graduation ceremony held at the Microsoft head offices last Thursday.

Their first batch of interns in the information and communication technologies (ICT) sector graduated after completing their internships at various employing partners nationally.

These students are now employable within the technological sector.

“Today was made possible by all the partners we have and it is an honour to have been able to run such a successful programme,” says Microsoft’s Mteto Nyati, Microsoft SA’s managing director.

With the thriving partnerships formed between the government’s Jobs Fund, MICT Seta, NetHope and Microsoft’s 4Afrika initiative, the organisation has been able to train 8,000 students since inception and will train 3,000 more in the next two years.

Student2Business was launched 8 years ago when Microsoft wanted to solve a problem that existed when companies wanted to recruit the right candidates in the (ICT) sector but could not lay their hands on their ideal candidates.

Microsoft also aimed to make a sustainable difference by alleviating unemployment by offering training and internship opportunities, through its partners, that will lead to employment, said Nqobile Diamini, the Citizenship Leader of Microsoft.

“The major success factor of this internship programme lies in the fact that 80 percent of the graduating students have gone on to find formal employment in the ICT sector this year,” she says.

“This is a substantial achievement that is sorely needed in light of the World Economic Forum’s scathing Global Risk 2014 report stating that South Africa has the third highest unemployment rate globally among its youth.”

She refers to this internship programme as very different because it produces a readily skilled graduate, trained within their craft and also one that has experience within the workplace setting.

Najwah Edries, National Treasury Head of Employment and Social Security PMU, said that this opportunity is an imperative move, given the job crisis in the country.

For the 2014 programme, 499 students have graduated nationally, and 700 young people who are still undergoing internships are due to finish this year.

Of the 250 Gauteng graduates, there were also those who received the top-achievers award, namely Michael Nthodi and Keith Radebe who both shared the number one spot; with Jason Lippinhof, Bonolo Mashiane, Jack Mathadi, Tumelo Mokwena and Jarryd Patterman who followed as runners-up within the programme.

“I am truly humbled and blessed to have been part of this programme that has opened so many doors for me.  After my formal tertiary education, things were not as smooth as one might reckon because I lacked work experience and further training that would make me invaluable,” says Nthodi.

“I spent two years full, unemployed until I settled for something I did not actually want.”

Nthodi then made the choice of applying for the Student2Business, which meant quitting his job to be what he wanted to be.

Now he is a permanent employee, doing what he loves and has always dreamed of doing.

*For more information, visit www.s2bprogram.com/southafrica.


Jennifer Gachukia

In Their Words: Accenture-NetHope Academy Interns

“I can say my growth has been tremendous. Accenture is a big, professional company with an objective of ‘high performance delivered’. I knew nothing less than hard work would be expected of me.” These words just begin to reflect the impact that Margaret Kareithi’s recent six-month NetHope Academy Internship with Accenture Development Partnerships in Kenya, has had on her life.

Margret Kareithi

Margaret Kareithi

In 2010, Accenture Foundation helped initiate NetHope Academy. Initially, NetHope Academy launched in only one country (Haiti) with just 39 technology-focused interns ready to grow, develop and ultimately get full time employment in the IT sector. Three years later, with the support of Accenture, Microsoft, Cisco and over 100 employers, NetHope Academy has expanded to four countries, and has served over 400 unemployed youth, 84% of which have secured employment after completing the program.

This year, in addition to the generous implementation and time and skills grants awarded to NetHope to improve and scale the NetHope Academy, Accenture provided another level of support by hosting internships.  In Kenya, two NetHope Academy interns, Margaret Karethi and Jennifer Gachukia had the opportunity to complete their NetHope Academy internships on an Accenture Development Partnership project. The project, in collaboration with The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, focused on business processes reengineering and digitizing government payments in order to streamline citizen’s access to government services. Both inspiring young women made a remarkable impression.

Margaret and Jennifer were two of four interns that Accenture Development Partnerships hosted this year. Their primary responsibilities were to complete in-depth research, stakeholder management and project management tasks.  Each has owned at least one business process on the project and responsibility for the data collection for that area, including conducting and capturing stakeholder interviews.

Accenture’s Liz Cruickshank, Alexandra Kern and Abhay Pathania were IT mentors to Margaret and Jennifer during their internships. They had quite a lot to share about the women’s impact on the project and the changes they witnessed in their professional growth. Margaret and Jennifer were initially noticed for their overwhelming demonstration of enthusiasm to be on the project.  Quickly, each took hold of her specific focus areas, proving their commitment and willingness to take initiative and learn. Their IT mentors also commented on the consistent level of preparedness and professionalism Margaret and Jennifer had around the work they were asked to do, “They were always ready to answer questions on any figures or processes that required follow up.”

Jennifer Gachukia

Jennifer Gachukia

Margaret and Jennifer each clearly came into their internship committed and ready to contribute, but their mentors also saw tremendous growth in their skills over the course of the internship.   Most remarkable to the mentors was Margaret and Jennifer’s significant improvement in their communication skills. They developed confidence by being given the opportunity to design presentations and deliver those presentations to clients.  Their mentors eventually trusted them enough to work directly with government stakeholders as well.

Each woman distinguished herself on the project.

Margaret was known for her unwavering professionalism. Though quiet and shy initially, within a few weeks she emerged as a mature professional who worked hard and gave her best, even in unfamiliar territory. Each time Margaret was given a task, she progressively took on more responsibility and ownership. She became known and valued for her very natural presentation style.

Jennifer, known for her bubbly personality and warm energy was a real morale builder on the team. Confident and self-assured, she developed a great reputation for getting things done. Jennifer’s consistent display of determination and her strong organizational skills lead her to excel at managing client contacts for data collection and workshop preparation.  Liz Cruickshank, the project manager on the project said, “The number of times I finally got around to an activity only to find that Jennifer had already taken the initiative to get things rolling is something that was most appreciated and I will always remember.”

And, as is often the case with NetHope Academy internships, the learning was bi-directional. By hosting interns, Accenture Development Partnership team members got a chance to supervise and coach a less experienced team member.  Liz remarked, “The most important thing the ladies have taught me has been to set the right expectations on deliverables – both timing and substance. I’ve become a better manager and mentor the past few months.”

The NetHope Academy interns also provided Accenture project team members with a closer connection to the Kenyan people, an often difficult feat during short-term engagements.  Margaret and Jennifer’s presence on the team meant that additional perspectives were incorporated into the work, which is often valuable for those project team members who are unfamiliar with the local culture. The Accenture Development Partnerships team felt Margaret’s and Jennifer’s presence to be particularly beneficial in helping them better understand their clients.

Said Jennifer about the impact her internship experience had on her, “I came out of college thinking that I have a lot of knowledge only to realize that knowledge is ‘useless’ without the hands-on skills. I am grateful that NetHope and Accenture gave me wings to fly.”

Margaret Kareithi and Jennifer Gachukia are two inspiring women who took the opportunity NetHope Academy and Accenture provided to excel in their internships, build credible business relationships, develop lasting skills for long term success and they also helped develop others along the way.


Read articles & stories about the NetHope Academy Kenya

To learn more about the NetHope Academy visit the IT Internship Program page.

Supporters of NetHope Academy Kenya

Kenya ICT Board Logo African Centre for Women, Information and Communications Technology Logo Accenture Logo


Nethopelogo_150x150

A Question to NetHope Academy Interns – Who Are You?

As we enter the new year, I have been thinking about all that we have learned over the last two  years working with almost 400 NetHope Academy Interns and Graduates.    We are inspired almost every week by stories from Kenya, Haiti, Rwanda, Ghana and South Africa.

We see amazing young women and men come out of our programs from rural areas, big cities, large universities and smaller technical institutions.  We see interns that survive the rigorous screening process only to find that there are many just like them that are the “best of the best”.   Suddenly “the best” is “average”.

We have challenged interns to learn more and many have responded by earning multiple industry recognized technical certifications.  And then there are some amazing stories about interns that have single handedly enhanced programs that were desperately short of qualified IT professionals – the food distribution programs in Haiti, the rural broadband rollouts in Rwanda and the workgroup collaboration efforts of Microsoft partners in Kenya.

But we see problems from time to time.  Why is it that one intern does so well and another does not?  When we go deeply into analyzing the performance we find that we can’t say that its education or intern placement or IT mentor.  And we also know that it has nothing to do with where you were born or whether you are a man or a woman.     The single biggest factor turns out to be ATTITUDE. Let me introduce you to two fictional interns to illustrate the point.  These interns could be anyone.    I will call them Jayden and Kennedy.   As you read through these, be thinking about who you are.  Or who you want to be.

********************************************************************

Jayden says that NetHope is teaching technical skills that Jayden may never use.  And NetHope is requiring that Jayden achieve certifications that future employers may never care about.

Kennedy thinks that education of all kinds is a gift and learning new things may actually open up new opportunities.  Kennedy knows that employers look at certifications as evidence that the applicant has achieved a certain level of technical competence.  But perhaps as importantly, the employer sees someone that is a self learner which could mean a lot in the years to come.

Jayden is not happy with the internship they have received.  Jayden says “I will never want to be a desktop support technician so this is just a big waste of my time”.

Kennedy realizes that internships are hard to get and he/she is learning invaluable skills that will apply to just about anything.  Things like customer service, working with others, time management, conflict resolution.  Kennedy also knows that it’s impossible to predict what the future looks like but this is a great start.

Jayden says “NetHope is an NGO based in the US and should be able to do more for me … more money, better job assignment, find me a job”.

Kennedy says “I am excited to have been chosen for the program.  I can see NetHope’s commitment.  And I am learning a lot from my peers.  Everything is not 100% perfect but I am going to take advantage of everything that has been put in front of me.  No, I will do better than that.  I am going to exceed everyone’s expectations.

Jayden says “They tell us to do stuff – attend training sessions, acquire certifications, use the LMS, fill out self-evaluations … I know I will graduate so what does it really matter?”

Kennedy knows that the program is just six months long and wants to do it all.  Kennedy attends every training and shows up on time.  Kennedy knows all that is offered in the LMS and has taken a lot of courses that were not assigned.  And Kennedy knows that doing an honest self reflection on your work is the key to developing as an IT professional.  Kennedy thinks “who will care more about my career development than me?”

Jayden says “my stipend is just not acceptable” or “I don’t understand why I am making so much less than my NetHope Academy colleague”.

Kennedy says “it’s not about the money.  I am learning so much that I would pay THEM to do this.  I know they are investing in me.  I want to do the best I can now.  If they double my stipend now, it would not change my life.  I am looking to the future”.

********************************************************************

So who are you?  Are you Jayden?  Are you Kennedy?  Who do you want to be?  Who do you think your employers want you to be?

I welcome your thoughts … perhaps some of you will say “I am Kennedy.”   That’s great … Perhaps some of you will say “I have been like Jayden but I am going to work like Kennedy”.  And for those of you that don’t want to be like Kennedy, I can only say that I hope you give up your spot in the program to the Kennedys that would love to take your place.

Happy New Year!!!


Frank Schott has spent almost 30 years in the technology sector. Since 2005, Frank has served as a NetHope Senior Global Program Director in charge of the Field Capacity Building and Emergency Response initiatives. Frank was named a Microsoft Integral Fellow by the Microsoft Alumni Association. This prestigious award recognizes Microsoft alumnus who have made a meaningful difference in the lives of others by using his/her talents, time and resources to contribute to the world.


To learn more about the NetHope Academy, please visit NetHope Academy Homepage


Lynann and Emmanuella

What One Woman Can Do

Become a Mentor Today; Change a Life Forever

Emmanuella Stimphat, NetHope Academy Grad & Lynann Bradbury, Women's TechConnect Global Program Manager

On the day we officially launched Women’s TechConnect at the Grace Hopper Celebration in Baltimore, Maryland, I knew in an instant it would have lasting impact. Not just because of the interest among 3,600 technical women from 54 countries who were attending the conference. Not just because the CEO of the conference lauded it in her keynote address, propelling a flurry of Twitter feeds. Not just because of the myriad of companies wanting to sign up.

But because of the look in a young woman’s eyes.

Fatima approached me after I’d moderated a panel discussion on mentoring. She waited patiently as several women stood in a makeshift line to shake hands and ask me about the program. When she stepped forward and looked up, confidence rose in her voice.

“I cannot thank you enough for doing this program,” she said. “I’ve been praying for a mentor for years.” Fatima is a PhD student in computer science at Bahrai Unversity in Karachi, Pakistan. “As a 26 year old woman in Pakistan, I’m out there pioneering my own way. To have a woman mentor would mean the world to me.”
The look in her eyes conveyed the honesty of what she was saying. But the magnitude didn’t strike me until the next morning when I read newspaper accounts of a 14 year old girl in Pakistan who had been shot, advocating for girls’ education.

Standing next to me at the conference was another 26 year old woman, an IT Officer for Save the Children in Haiti. Emmanuella had started her Master’s program in Computer Science when the Haiti earthquake hit in 2010. Her studies ended abruptly when her university crumbled in the magnitude of the 7.0 earthquake, which also killed her mother. But it didn’t kill her spirit or quest to succeed as a technical woman. Through the NetHope Academy and initial work with Inveneo, Emmanuella helped rebuild the broadband network in Haiti, becoming a role model for other young women entering technology roles in her homeland, as well as in other developing countries.

We created Women’s TechConnect for the Fatimas and Emmanuellas of the world. So many young women from Africa, Latin America and other geographical regions have signed-up to participate, excited by the prospects of connecting 1:1 with a mentor, and engaging with like-minded women around the world through WTC’s global community. We also created it for women like Tracy Feliciani, a Senior Director at Accenture, Rahima Mohammed, a principal engineer at Intel, and Rane Johnson-Stempson, a senior leader and STEM advocate in Microsoft Research. The excitement from mentors is just as evident. Professional IT women from world class organizations in the U.S., Europe and around the globe have signed-up because they know the tremendous value of encouragement, empowerment and sharing their own stories. These women learn just as much from being a mentor, as younger women learn from them.

I do, too. I’ve been a mentor for the past five years to a professional woman and civic leader in Aurora, Colorado. Although we’ve only met once in a half decade, we connect every week. Monday mornings at 7:30 a.m. are reserved for Karen, regardless of my work schedule, travel plans or Monday holidays in the U.S. I get so much value from that relationship, I wouldn’t dream of giving it up.
Could the same hold true for you?

As a manager, you may never know the difference you’ve made by offering an opportunity to your employee to step up the corporate ladder. As a mother, you may never know the lasting effect of encouraging your child to overcome adversity. And as a mentor, you may never know the impact of helping your mentee find her voice, excel in technology and become a leader for the next generation.
But think of the women who’ve done that for you. Then sign up, and join us in making a lasting impact in the world, one woman at a time.

Learn More about Women’s TechConnect: http://www.womenstechconnect.org


Lynann Bradbury (NetHope), Emmanuella Stimphat (WTC Protegee), Radha Basu (Anudip Foundation) & Rane Johnson (Microsoft) help launch NetHope's Women's TechConnect Program at a Microsoft Womn in IT event.

From Seattle to Senegal Increasing the Number of Women IT Professionals

Huffington Post | William Brindley

10/22/2012

October 11 marked the International Day of the Girl. The energy around the inaugural UN-sponsored event provided an opportunity for organizations across the globe to highlight the challenges and opportunities facing girls and young women in both the Global North and the Global South. Arguably many of the issues are more acute for girls and young women living in countries with significant gender inequity. However, the dearth of women in Information Technology (IT) is a problem that spans geographic and cultural divides. This problem is also a huge opportunity.

 

On a global scale, women represent more than half of college graduates, yet only a small fraction of the technology sector workforce. This is particularly true in emerging economies where men overwhelmingly dominate the field. A 2011 report by the U.S. Department of Commerce indicates only one in seven engineers are female. And although women have earned about 57 percent of all bachelor’s degrees, men earn the majority of degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)-related fields. In fact in the last 10 years the proportion of science and engineering degrees awarded to women in the U.S. has actually declined. In developing countries where, on average, only one in five girls completes primary school the disparity is even greater.

To help address this disparity, NetHope launched Women’s TechConnect (WTC) earlier this month in partnership with Accenture and the Anita Borg Institute, an organization with a long history of championing women in technology. Announced at the Grace Hopper Celebration, Women’s TechConnect is an online global community and professional mentoring program for women in technology, to help grow the next generation of women leaders in Information Communications Technology (ICT) roles across the globe.

Lynann Bradbury (NetHope), Emmanuella Stimphat (WTC Protegee), Radha Basu (Anudip Foundation) & Rane Johnson (Microsoft) help launch NetHope's Women's TechConnect Program at a Microsoft Giving Campaign event in Seattle.

The program brings together women ICT professionals in humanitarian and corporate sectors to learn, grow and empower one another — from entry-level to leadership. It also encourages the recruitment, retention and success of women in ICT in emerging markets by connecting professional women in technology from the Western world with the next generation of women in technology in the developing world. This creates a sustainable continuum of success for women and girls in-country, by establishing role models, mentors and community leaders at all levels.

The early response to Women’s TechConnect has been strong. From a PhD candidate in Pakistan, to a single-mom who just graduated from the NetHope Academy in Rwanda, to an entry-level IT officer in Haiti, young women with IT skills are pioneering their way into the industry in emerging markets, eagerly waiting for mentors and role models. Women’s TechConnect helps them make the transition from school to work and jump-start their career.

But it also helps women IT professionals progress as leaders. Many corporations are interested in the program, as it helps them boost their gender-based leadership programs, supporting the recruitment, retention and job satisfaction of women in technical roles. It also helps them better understand emerging markets, and bridge the span between public and private sectors.

Here’s how you can get involved:

  • If you work for a corporation interested in supporting women and girls in the developing world, instituting a mentoring program, growing your own leadership bench of women and/or building a stronger presence in emerging markets, contact us to talk about becoming a corporate partner.
  • If you are a woman in an IT role and would like to boost your own leadership skills as you help another woman in the humanitarian sector or developing world enter and thrive in the IT space, sign up to be a mentor.
  • And if you are a young woman in ICT space reading this from Latin America, Africa, Asia or any other part of the world sign up to be a mentee.

Fostering the next generation of ICT professionals is foundational to NetHope’s mission. And we’re excited about the opportunity to deliver programming tailored to the needs of women in the field. Not only will this expand the pool of talented women IT professionals around the world, it will create job opportunities that will positively impact the social and economic future of these women, their families and entire communities.


WTC_GHC Panel_cropped

NetHope’s Women’s TechConnect Jumpstarts the Next Generation of Women in Technology in the Developing World

Baltimore, MD – October 4, 2012 – Today, NetHope announced the launch of Women’s TechConnect, a global online community and professional mentoring program that brings together professional IT women from the Western world with the next generation of women in technology in the developing world. Combining 1:1 mentoring, professional development and a collaborative approach to problem solving, Women’s TechConnect supports women in Africa, Latin America and other developing regions to enter, grow and succeed in Information Communication Technology (ICT) roles.
Launched at the Grace Hopper Celebration, the world’s largest conference of women in computing, Women’s TechConnect is a partnership of NetHope, Accenture and the Anita Borg Institute (ABI). The program encourages the retention and recruitment of women in technology around the globe, empowering women to overcome cultural, technical and professional challenges that may have impeded opportunities in the past.
“Our ultimate goal is to grow the number of women and girls in technology, improving livelihoods and creating an ongoing, sustainable path out of poverty – now and for generations to come,” said Lynann Bradbury, a NetHope Global Program Manager and co-Leader of Women’s TechConnect.

Panelists: Lynann Bradbury (NetHope), Emmanuella Stimphat (Save the Children/Haiti), Tracy Feliciani (Accenture),
Khuloud Odeh (Grameen Foundation), Rane Johnson-Stempson (Microsoft)
On a global scale, women represent more than half of college graduates, yet only a small fraction of the technology sector workforce. This is particularly true in emerging economies where men overwhelmingly dominate the field. NetHope, ABI and Accenture believe that increasing the number of women and girls in Information Communication Technologies (ICT) creates a continuum of success for women and their families, and at the same time, boosts the pool of qualified IT professionals in these economies.
“I am especially thrilled about this important program, as it brings ABI closer to Anita Borg’s personal vision of ‘technology positively impacting the lives of the world’s women’ and accelerates STEM efforts throughout the world,” noted Telle Whitney, CEO and President, ABI.
The program was initially funded through a generous grant by Accenture as part of the company’s Skills to Succeed initiative, which will equip 250,000 people by 2015 with the skills to get a job or build a business.
“Women’s TechConnect is a direct fit with Accenture’s Skills to Succeed effort which applies our core competence – training talent – to the need for developing skills that open doors to employment around the world,” said Tracy Feliciani, a Senior Director in Accenture’s Technology Growth Platform, and executive champion for the Women’s TechConnect program. Feliciani was one of four speakers on a global mentoring panel yesterday at Grace Hopper Celebration, urging other professional women to engage as mentors and sponsors of the program.
Professional women in computing fields who have technical backgrounds and an interest in helping other women enter and succeed in the field are encouraged to get involved. Initially piloted with women in Kenya, Rwanda and Haiti earlier this fall, NetHope is seeking additional corporate partners to help scale the program broadly throughout the developing world. For more information go to www.womenstechconnect.org and follow @NH_WomenTech.
NetHope, Inc., which started in 2001, is a new-generation collaboration of the international community’s leading nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) representing over $33 billion (USD) of emergency relief, human development and conservation programs in more than 150 countries. Through member collaboration and by facilitating public-private partnerships with major technology companies, NetHope enables members to leverage their technology investments to better serve their end beneficiaries. For more information, visit www.nethope.org.
The Anita Borg Institute provides resources and programs to help industry, academia, and government recruit, retain, and develop women leaders in high-tech fields, resulting in higher levels of technological innovation. Our programs serve high-tech women by creating a community and providing tools to help them develop their careers. The Anita Borg Institute is a not-for-profit 501(c) 3 charitable organization. Partners include: Google, HP, Microsoft, Amazon, CA Technologies, Cisco, Dell, Facebook, First Republic Bank, IBM, Intel, Intuit, Juniper Networks, Lockheed Martin, Marvell, National Science Foundation, National Security Agency, NetApp, Salesforce.com, SAP, Symantec, Thomson Reuters, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Broadcom, EMC, Neustar, Raytheon, and Yahoo! For more information, visit www.anitaborg.org.
Accenture is a global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company, with 257,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries. Combining unparalleled experience, comprehensive capabilities across all industries and business functions, and extensive research on the world’s most successful companies, Accenture collaborates with clients to help them become high-performance businesses and governments. The company generated net revenues of US$27.9 billion for the fiscal year ended Aug. 31, 2012. Its home page is www.accenture.com.
# # #
For More Information:
Colene McBeth, Director of Strategic Partnerships, NetHope
Colene.mcbeth@nethope.org
Brendan Blandy, Account Executive, Waggener Edstrom
bblandy@waggeneredstrom.com

NetHope Academy Rwanda Students Enjoying Time Together

First NetHope Academy Class Graduates in Rwanda

Students conclude internships in Rwanda

Read more articles & stories about the NetHope Academy Rwanda

Kigali, Rwanda – Sept. 28, 2012 – NetHope held a graduation ceremony in Kigali today for 39 IT students graduating from its inaugural Rwanda NetHope Academy class. NetHope Academy – a six-month program that provides computer science students with both classroom and on-the-job IT skills training – translates vocational training into full time professional employment for young Rwandan adults. In fact, NetHope expects that more than 80 percent of students graduating from the program today will be in full-time IT positions within the next three months.

In March 2012, NetHope expanded its successful Haiti NetHope Academy program to Africa, making it available for the first time on the continent to students in Rwanda and Kenya. Rwandan students began their NetHope Academy journey in Kigali with two weeks of intensive classroom and online training where they developed the most current and relevant IT skills. The students then began their internships, where they gained nearly six months of on-the-job experience that allowed them to refine the skills they learned in the classroom. Given the success, NetHope hosted its next Rwanda Academy classes in July.

“We’re thrilled that NetHope Academy has been so successful in Rwanda,” said Frank Schott, Senior Global Program Director of NetHope Academy. “The students are what make it work; we have the best and the brightest youth competing for the program, and they give it their all. I’m so proud of their accomplishments and the value they bring to the Rwandan IT industry.”

IT professionals are in high demand across the African continent. Employment opportunities, however, are often limited to those who have work experience. NetHope Academy provides training and certification in the most relevant technical skills, supplemented with practical on-the-job work experience and daily mentoring and guidance. As a result, graduates of the program are fully competent in the current IT sector and highly employable. NetHope Academy works closely with technology partners including Accenture and the Accenture Foundations, Microsoft, Cisco, ESRI, Global VSAT Forum and others to bring the best offerings to the intern program.

The students interned with a variety of host organizations including CARE, Plan, World Vision, BSC, and the Government of Rwanda, among others. NetHope Academy also provided the students with job placement assistance and connected them with mentors who provide regular guidance and evaluation.

“So far my proudest achievement in technology was joining the NetHope Internship program where I was able to complete a two week Microsoft boot camp where I gained more than technical skills but also skills that will help me in the ICT field,” said Faith Murigi, NetHope Academy Graduate..

In addition to its traditional NetHope Academy program, NetHope recently launched a new program optimized for students who aspire to become IT entrepreneurs vs. IT professionals like the students enrolled in the traditional NetHope Academy program. NetHope is partnering with Enablis, a Canadian-based nonprofit organization that supports entrepreneurs in the developing world, to facilitate its entrepreneurial academy in Kenya, Rwanda and Ghana. Students will be admitted based on how well they compete in a business plan competition, and the top students will receive mentorship from current entrepreneurs. Select entrepreneurs will receive seed funding to pursue their business plans.

Read more articles & stories about the NetHope Academy Rwanda

About NetHope

NetHope, Inc., which started in 2001, is a new-generation collaboration of the international community’s leading nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) representing over $33 billion (USD) of emergency relief, human development and conservation programs in more than 150 countries. Through member collaboration and by facilitating public-private partnerships with major technology companies, NetHope enables members to leverage their technology investments to better serve their end beneficiaries. For more information, visit www.nethope.org.

For More Information Contact:

Brendan Blandy, NetHope Media Relations

bblandy@waggeneredstrom.com

+1-503-443-7293

Supporters of NetHope Academy Rwanda

Rwanda Development Board Logo Accenture Logo


NetHope Academy Kenya

First NetHope Academy Class Graduates in Kenya

Students conclude internships in Kenya

Read more articles & stories about the NetHope Academy Kenya

Nairobi, Kenya – Sept. 21, 2012 – NetHope held a graduation ceremony in Nairobi today for 37 IT students graduating from its inaugural Kenya NetHope Academy class. NetHope Academy – a six-month program that provides computer science students with both classroom and on-the-job IT skills training – translates vocational training into full time professional employment for young Kenyan adults. In fact, NetHope expects that more than 80 percent of students graduating from the program today will be in full-time IT positions within the next three months.

In March 2012, NetHope expanded its successful Haiti NetHope Academy program to Africa, making it available for the first time on the continent to students in Kenya and Rwanda. Kenyan students began their NetHope Academy journey in Nairobi with two weeks of intensive classroom and online training where they developed the most current and relevant IT skills. The students then began their internships, where they gained nearly six months of on-the-job experience that allowed them to refine the skills they learned in the classroom. Given the success, NetHope will host its next Kenya Academy classes in September.

“We’re thrilled that NetHope Academy has been so successful in Kenya,” said Frank Schott, Senior Global Program Director of NetHope Academy. “The students are what make it work; we have the best and the brightest youth competing for the program, and they give it their all. I’m so proud of their accomplishments and the value they bring to the Kenyan IT industry.”

IT professionals are in high demand across the African continent. Employment opportunities, however, are often limited to those who have work experience. NetHope Academy provides training and certification in the most relevant technical skills, supplemented with practical on-the-job work experience and daily mentoring and guidance. As a result, graduates of the program are fully competent in the current IT sector and highly employable. NetHope Academy works closely with technology partners including Kenya ICT Board, Accenture and the Accenture Foundations, Microsoft, Cisco, ESRI, Global VSAT Forum and others to bring the best offerings to the intern program.

Two-thirds of the students in the Nairobi class are women, who NetHope believes will play a crucial role in growing the ICT sector in Kenya. NetHope partnered with the African Centre for Women, Information and Communications Technology (ACWICT) to identify the highly skilled young women who are now students in NetHope Academy and with both Microsoft and Cisco offices in East Africa.

“According to a 2011 National ICT Market Survey, although an estimated 9,600 ICT graduates are absorbed in to the market annually, a third of the companies still contract external providers due to lack of relevant high end skills and work experience in our workforce,” said Eunice Kariuki, Marketing Director for the Kenya ICT Board. “The Kenya ICT Board has been elated by the opportunities offered by NetHope Academy in improving the capacity of these local ICT graduates.“

Kenyan students interned with a variety of host organizations including CARE, Save the Children, International Rescue Committee, and Computer Revolution Africa, among others. NetHope Academy also provided the students with job placement assistance and connected them with mentors who provide regular guidance and evaluation.

“Pursing a job in technology has not been easy. Most companies and organizations wanted employees with at least three years of experience,” said Liz Kerosi, NetHope Academy Graduate. “The competition was fierce; other candidates were highly educated and had various IT certifications. But thanks to NetHope Academy, I got the chance to take a powerful Microsoft course and participate in Women’s TechConnect, which gave me the hope of getting a full time job thereafter. Many companies believe if a woman has managed to go far in her studies, she must be very smart and strong enough to handle a top job,” says Liz. “To all the women out there, go ahead and advance yourself without fear.”

In addition to its traditional NetHope Academy program, NetHope recently launched a new program optimized for students who aspire to become IT entrepreneurs vs. IT professionals like the students enrolled in the traditional NetHope Academy program. NetHope is partnering with Enablis, a Canadian- based nonprofit organization that supports entrepreneurs in the developing world, to facilitate its entrepreneurial academy in Kenya, Rwanda and Ghana. Students will be admitted based on how well they compete in a business plan competition, and the top students will receive mentorship from current entrepreneurs. Select entrepreneurs will receive seed funding to pursue their business plans.

Read more articles & stories about the NetHope Academy Kenya

About NetHope

NetHope, Inc., which started in 2001, is a new-generation collaboration of the international community’s leading nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) representing over $33 billion (USD) of emergency relief, human development and conservation programs in more than 150 countries. Through member collaboration and by facilitating public-private partnerships with major technology companies, NetHope enables members to leverage their technology investments to better serve their end beneficiaries. For more information, visit www.nethope.org.

For More Information Contact:

Brendan Blandy, NetHope Media Relations

bblandy@waggeneredstrom.com

+1-503-443-7293


Supporters of NetHope Academy Kenya

Kenya ICT Board LogoAfrican Centre for Women, Information and Communications Technology LogoAccenture Logo


Older Posts »